Apple Robbery Ring busted in part

The video you’ll see immediately below this paragraph was shared by police officials several months ago. At that time, no arrests had been made. We’re to understand that this is at least part of the group that took part in robberies of multiple Apple Store locations. NOTE that the man at the end of the video attempting to stop the robbery was an off-duty police officer, not just a random crazy person or Apple Store employee. Robberies went like so: Multiple suspects enter Apple Store. Suspects, wearing hoodies with long sleeves and full-length pants, pull merchandise from display tables, removing loose devices as well as those held down with security cables. Suspects do not seem to threaten anyone, and in most cases get away without any injury.AdChoices广告It’s been suggested by police officials that the alleged crimes took place over a period of several weeks and hit Apple Store locations for “the loss of over $1 million” across 19 counties in the state of California. Of those individuals for whom charges and/or arrest warrants were issued, 10 are currently in police custody – 9 in Alameda County Jail, and another is in custody in Sonoma County. Nine other arrest warrants were issued.Attorney General Becerra filed charges for “conspiracy to commit grand theft” against “the individuals in Fresno, Santa Clara, and Alameda Counties.” None of these individuals has yet been tried in a court of law. “Every defendant is presumed innocent until proven guilty,” according to the California state government website of the State of California Department of Justice. California police announced the arrest and charges of a ring of Apple product thieves from across the state. The announcement came from California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, who noted that they’d arrested 17 individuals who were then charged for their roles in a robbery scheme that seemed to target Apple retail stores over the period of several months. read more

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Google Pixel 3 XL durability test is mostly reassuring

As with any glass-metal-glass smartphone sandwich, there is always the worry that it would break under pressure. Of course, this isn’t your standard glass and Nelson’s mighty arms couldn’t even make the Pixel 3 XL flex. In other words, it passes the bend test.The Pixel 3 XL, like its forebears, uses an AMOLED screen, whose pixels often turn white after 10 or so seconds and leave a permanent ghost. Samsung, however, may have developed a way to foil the YouTuber’s tests and the Pixel 3 XL’s screen recovered completely after barely 30 seconds of intense direct flame. So it also aced the burn test.The Pixel 3 XL mostly passes the scratch test too. Mostly. The front Gorilla Glass is, as you’d expect, impervious to anything below a level 6 Mohs scale pick. It’s the glass back that’s the problem. In order to create matte-like texture, Google opted to frost the top of the glass rather than underneath it. As such, it is at the mercy of keys and coins in your back or pocket.AdChoices广告It’s still glass, mind, but one that might not look like glass after a few permanent lines. While it’s definitely nice to see some variation in what has practically become near identical smartphone designs, it shouldn’t have to be at the expense of durability. This is definitely one phone you’ll want to put a case or skin on. With the Pixel phones, Google stepped into the shoes of a smartphone maker and a premium smartphone maker at that. With that comes high prices and concerns about the durability of such expensive purchases. So far, the Pixel has been doing quite well under the cruel hands of JerryRigEverything’s Zack Nelson. The Pixel 3 XL might be ridiculed and criticized for its large notch, but it fortunately fares well just the same. Well, mostly well. read more

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Samsung adds 62 new pieces of artwork to Frame TV Art Store

first_imgThe Frame is a unique TV capable of blending into a room’s existing decor when not in use. The television is designed to display artwork, which is acquired through Samsung’s Art Store where more than 1,000 pieces of artwork are legally accessible. Under the partnerships with these three museums and galleries, customers now have another 62 pieces of artwork to choose from.Users can find artwork based on categories like composition, colors, and other filters. These improved personalization options make it easier for users to discover new artists and pieces of artwork that suit their tastes or fit in with existing room decor.Frame TV owners don’t have to manually switch to every new piece of art, instead also having the option to create their own custom galleries and slideshows, which play throughout the day to keep things fresh. Users can choose intervals for artwork refreshing that ranges from every 10 minutes to once per week.Samsung has built-in brightness sensors the monitor the ambient light in the room where the TV is located. This technology is used to automatically adjust the TV’s brightness levels, keeping them in the ideal range for the room at any given time. As well, the product features motion sensors for automatically turning the TV off when no one is around to see it.Samsung offers “The Frame” in sizes ranging from 43- to 65-inches. Buyers can choose different bezels, including black, white, beige wood, and walnut. To help maintain the aesthetic, Samsung includes One Visible Connection, which makes the AV and power cables “near-invisible.” Samsung’s stylish “The Frame” TV can now display additional artwork thanks to new partnerships with The Van Gogh Museum, Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, and Uffizi Galleries. Under this partnership, Samsung is able to offer The Frame TV owners access to an additional 62 pieces of artwork through the platform’s Art Store. Story TimelineSamsung patents a phone with displays on almost all sidesSamsung just ‘confirmed’ these Galaxy S10 detailsGalaxy A8s no-jack photos show End Is Near for Samsunglast_img read more

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Dubai is getting miniature selfdriving police cars later this year

first_imgWhile the benefits of such a vehicle are apparent — it reduces the necessity of actual man-power, making officers available to take calls — such technology isn’t without ample critics. Many individuals cite such technology as being too invasive and a challenge to privacy, subjecting individuals to cameras and 24/7 monitoring, the data from which can then live on for long periods of time on law enforcement servers.SOURCE: Gulf News These mini police cars feature software and hardware that enable them to scan for ‘undesirables’ and known criminals, according to Gulf News. The vehicles are able to spot people breaking the law or, more vaguely, those who are suspected of breaking the law, though details on that aren’t forthcoming. The autonomous patrol cars are said to be capable of hunting for any suspicious activity while driving around crowds of people.The goal is to increase security in the city while freeing police officers for other tasks. A drone embedded within the vehicle can be deployed if necessary; it is linked with the city police’s command room and can be monitored by officials. It isn’t clear whether officers can manually use the drones to monitor regions remotely or if the drones are autonomous, reporting in only during times of interest.The robotic vehicles are called O-R3 by creator OTSAW, which is based out of Singapore. The vehicles were created specifically for the purpose of serving on police forces for large cities, per the manufacturer’s website, being explicitly marketed as surveillance devices. In addition to discovering crime, the robots are intended to serve as a deterrent. Dubai is upgrading its police force with a bit of machine intelligence, announcing plans to deploy robotic, self-driving patrol cars later on this year. Assuming the police department follows through with the plans, this will mark the first time a city has utilized autonomous vehicles as part of its daily patrols, a reality that won’t rest easy with everyone. The vehicles are described as being miniature in size.center_img Story TimelineDubai firefighters demonstrate jetpack fire extinguishersDubai sets autonomous flying cars loose this summerDubai’s “real Robocop” starts its active dutylast_img read more

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Report Uber cut back LiDAR sensors in new Volvo fleet

first_imgAccording to Reuters, Uber’s transition from a fleet of autonomous Ford Fusions to Volvo XC90s was more than just an aesthetic change. Reuters reports that Uber cut back on the number of LiDAR sensors present on its autonomous vehicles when it made the switch, going from the seven sensors that were present on the Ford Fusion to just one in the Volvo XC90.LiDAR is a crucial component for autonomous driving systems, as it helps detect objects in a 360-degree circle around the vehicle. Primary LiDAR sensors typically sit on the roofs of autonomous vehicles, just like what you see with the XC90 pictured above. While that’s the sole LiDAR sensor on Uber’s current fleet of autonomous vehicles, other cars typically have smaller sensors placed on the sides and front to help compensate for the blind spots of the main, rooftop one.Instead of installing those additional LiDAR sensors on its XC90s, it seems that Uber planned to compensate with additional radars instead – the XC90 uses 10 radar sensors, while older Ford Fusions only used 7. Even then, Uber also cut back on the total number of cameras on the XC90, dropping from the 20 that were found on its Ford Fusions to just 7 with this newer fleet.AdChoices广告The result is a sleeker looking autonomous vehicle, but now the question becomes whether or not scaling back on sensor count ultimately played a part in this fatal accident. Reuters spoke to Velodyne, the company that makes the XC90’s rooftop LiDAR sensor, which said that an autonomous vehicle should have side-mounted LiDAR to help it avoid pedestrians.To be clear, this report doesn’t claim that the XC90’s fewer safety sensors were responsible for the accident. There are any number of possible reasons why the accident occurred, so we’re just going to have to wait for the results of the ongoing investigation to know for sure. Still, this report will probably raise new questions at a time when Uber is already facing rather intense scrutiny. Stay tuned. Story TimelineIntel responds to Uber self-driving accident with critical analysisNVIDIA halts autonomous car testing after fatal Uber crashUber won’t renew its California self-driving test permit While we’re still awaiting the results of the investigation into last week’s fatal Uber crash, we’re left wondering who or what was at fault. Even though video of the accident exists, we’re still not sure what caused it – did the car’s autonomous driving systems fail in some way, or can this accident be blamed on some other oversight? That’s what this investigation aims to discover, but while we wait for the results, a new report levels some fairly serious accusations at Uber.last_img read more

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2019 Ford Focus launch teased ahead of April 10 reveal

first_imgNow, courtesy of Ford Romania, we know when we’ll find out all the details. The country’s Facebook page has posted a new teaser of the 2019 Focus, complete with the confirmation that we’ll know everything come April 10. The video itself doesn’t give us a full view of the new car, though it does go over some of the basics. The grille has a hexagonal mesh, bolder than that of the outgoing third-generation Focus. The wheels, too, are more extravagant than the current car, though the sizable two-tone alloys are certainly not going to be found on the entry-level models. Distinctive daytime running lights are built into the headlights, with inverted L-shaped LEDs spanning across the middle of the lamp clusters. Again, it’s unlikely that these are going to be on the more affordable models in the 2019 Focus line-up, but it’s a sign that the automaker is aiming for something more distinctive. Finally, there’s a sizable Focus badge spread across the rear under the Ford logo, much more noticeable than the current, compact badging. AdChoices广告The compact hatchback space is a tricky one to play in, dominated as it is by price concerns among buyers, and with plenty of competition from US domestic and international automakers. The field has only become more aggressive as drivers are swayed by the upright driving position of compact crossovers, too. According to previous rumors, Ford will kick the 2019 Focus off with an affordable model and an ST Line variant, the latter coming with a little extra heat. The car we really want to see, however, is a new fourth-generation Focus RS. That, though, may still be some way out on the horizon. By then, Ford is expected to have made a significant shift toward electrifying its cars, and the new RS will be no different. Whereas the last model has a 2.3-liter gas engine, the next RS is believed to use an electrified drivetrain that will combine gas and electric power for greater power and torque while still not upsetting emissions standards. We’ll know more in a little over a week, when Ford finally takes the wraps off the 2019 Focus. At that point expect some polite evasion when it comes to a new Focus RS, but all the rumors suggest that the supposed death of the hot hatch has been declared prematurely. [Thanks Carl!] Ford may be shifting a huge portion of its investment to utility vehicles like trucks and SUVs, but upcoming mass-market cars like the 2019 Ford Focus are still a priority. Headed into its fourth-generation, the hatchback has been a mainstay of Ford’s line-up since 1997, with the range including both super-economical versions and high performance cars like the sadly-discontinued Focus RS.last_img read more

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Driveai selfdriving car service pilot arrives in Texas this summer

first_imgStarting this summer, autonomous car company Drive.ai will roll out an autonomous car service pilot program in Frisco, Texas. The company plans to offer more than 10,000 rides to the public as part of the pilot program, one being done in cooperation with the Frisco Transportation Management Association. Though the pilot will start modestly, the company has already revealed some of its plans for expansion. According to Drive.ai, the pilot program will initially operate with fixed pickup and drop-off locations near both The Star and HALL Park. However, the company plans to expand those locations in the future to include Frisco Station. It’s a notable milestone for both the company and for Texas — this is the state’s first on-demand self-driving car service available to the public.Talking about the plan is Frisco’s Mayor Jeff Cheney, who said:Frisco is recognized as a leader in using ‘smart,’ innovative traffic technologies. Drive.ai’s autonomous vehicles will help people get around one of our most vibrant, commercial areas along Frisco’s ‘North Platinum Corridor.’ We applaud the collaboration of the Denton County Transportation Authority, as well as our private partners at HALL Park, Frisco Station and The Star, which gave the green light, so to speak, to this pioneering pilot program. Today definitely marks a mobility milestone for our entire region. It also gets us closer to achieving one of our council’s ‘Top Ten’ goals, which is to improve traffic throughout Frisco, one of the fastest growing cities in the country.Once Drive.ai’s pilot goes live, the public will have access to a mobile app through which they hail the self-driving cars. These will be complementary rides during the pilot, according to the company.The announcement follows a similar push in Las Vegas, where Lyft and Aptiv are working together to offer autonomous rides to everyone. Under that effort, which started with a pilot during CES 2018, Aptiv self-driving cars with human safety drivers will be available to order through the Lyft app.last_img read more

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Huawei P30 Pro durability test redeems Huaweis P brand

first_imgThose who follow the YouTuber might have one other reason to worry. Last year, the Huawei P20 Pro failed his durability test, both in heavy scratches and the ensuing bend test. With a more expensive and more sophisticated phone, the stakes are even higher. Fortunately, the formula has also changed.The P30 Pro’s screen started to show scratch marks with a Mohs level 6 pick, consistent with tempered glass screens. It should be noted that Huawei doesn’t advertise Gorilla Glass for its phones. The phones optical fingerprint scanner also continues to work under heavy scratches.The bend test is where it’s at, of course, and the Huawei P30 Pro, fortunately, does withstand Nelson’s massive hands. He theorizes that the new curved edge screen adds to the device’s structural integrity but at the expense of higher risk of breaking from falls. One odd thing about the test is how the OLED screen’s white burn didn’t recover. That may have been a common trait of OLED panels but we’ve seen recent examples of some that do. It is also amusing to note how Nelson seems to be fixated on the Huawei P30 Pro’s “Breathing Crystal” color, proving that, while beautiful, these fancy gradients won’t be to everyone’s tastes. The Huawei P30 Pro is arguably the best smartphone so far this year, especially if you consider its fancy new 5x optical zoom camera. It is, however, also one of the most expensive, if you can even get your hands on one in some markets like the US. With a precious phone like that, consumers have every reason to be worried about its long-term chances of survival. Zack Nelson from YouTube channel JerryRigEverything, fortunately, does the grueling torture test to bring that answer before you even invest in one.last_img read more

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Verizon 5G confirmed for these 20 cities next

first_imgVerizon doesn’t give precise release dates for the roll out of 5G Ultra Wideband – which is what Verizon calls its 5G mobility service – in these cities, only saying that all 20 will have it at some point in 2019. The cities confirmed today include Atlanta, Boston, Charlotte, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Dallas, Des Moines, Denver, Detroit, Houston, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Little Rock, Memphis, Phoenix, Providence, San Diego, Salt Lake City and Washington DC.There is one thing to keep in mind about this roll out. At first, 5G service will only be available in certain portions of these cities, so we won’t see consistent coverage for any of them at first. Verizon took this approach with Chicago and Minneapolis earlier this month, opting to launch in certain areas of both cities instead of waiting until it could blanket the entirety of both with 5G service.With these new cities confirmed to get 5G Ultra Wideband service in some capacity, Verizon is up to 22 cities that will have 5G by the end of the year. The company said today that it plans to have 5G up and running in more than 30 markets by the end of the year, so we’ll keep an eye out for more announcements like this in the coming weeks and months.For now, 5G service is only available to customers on Verizon’s Above Unlimited and Beyond Unlimited plans. Verizon plans to offer its 5G service as a $10 add-on to both of those plans, but for the time being, it’s waiving those fees. Stay tuned for more, because the next 5G announcement from Verizon is probably coming up soon. Slowly but surely, carriers have started rolling out their mobile 5G networks. Though Verizon wasn’t the first to get its mobile 5G network off the ground – that distinction goes to AT&T – it’s looking to get the ball moving rather quickly. Verizon’s 5G network launched in parts of Chicago and Minneapolis earlier this month, and now Verizon has announced 20 other cities that will receive 5G service by the end of the year. Story TimelineVerizon 5G for phones goes live: Where you can get it and what you needVerizon Galaxy S10 5G pre-orders start next weekVerizon Galaxy S10 5G launch day revealed in press renderlast_img read more

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Galaxy Note 10 release again tipped with major button changes

first_imgBoth tips popped up on Android Police earlier today, including one with “stronger confirmation” of an earlier rumor that the Galaxy Note would axe buttons. Is it Paul Bunyan appreciation day in here? I feel like I’m surrounded by axes. It was also suggested that the headphone jack would be removed.Of course the headphone jack will most likely be removed because Samsung’s been hinting at moving away from said jack for several midrange phone releases in the recent past. Not to mention the most expensive Samsung phone ever, the Galaxy Fold, does not have a headphone jack (regardless of its lack of a finalized release date, etcetera). The leaky tip-line followed up on the first leak this morning with a second, suggesting that the removal of the physical buttons was actually axed, and the final Galaxy Note 10 designs (regular and Pro) will both have their volume and power buttons intact. The Bixby button, however, may still be removed, surgically, and cauterized in a way that will allow us to forget that there ever was such a thing as a Bixby button in the first place.If you’d like to go buttonless, you’ll need to head back to the semi-buttonless HTC U12+ or the Meizu Zero, a smartphone that might never end up existing in the real world. Unless you’re very, very rich and want to push Meizu to make their Zero a reality – and I can’t imagine would be worth the cash anyway. As for the Galaxy Note 10, you’ll likely find an August 7, 2019 reveal date and a release date several weeks later. The Galaxy Note 10 will likely launch alongside the Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Pro, and both will likely have Android 9 Pie inside, with pathways to glorious Android Q action sooner rather than later. Story TimelineGalaxy Note 10 launch date tipped, screen protectors confirm designGalaxy Note 10 Pro release tipped less expensive than FoldGalaxy Note 10 Sound on Display could be its next big feature Today a tip suggests that the release date for the Galaxy Note 10 will be major, for a couple of reasons. It’ll be a major launch for Samsung not just because it’ll include the first “Note Pro” model, but because it’ll axe the Galaxy Note’s buttons. Or at least that was the word of the first tipster – less than an hour after the first tip, a second tip axed the first. It’s a tip war!last_img read more

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2020 Lexus LS 500 Inspiration Series lands this fall in Deep Garnet

first_imgLexus has announced a new car that will land this fall called the 2020 Lexus LS 500 Inspiration Series. The car marks the first use of a maroon paint color on the LS 500 called Deep Garnet. Inspiration models come with standard 20-inch wheels in “Black Vapor Chrome” finish. Inside the car comes with a standard White and Black interior with Kiriko Glass trim. The 2020 LS 500 Inspiration is the fourth Inspraiton vehicle from Lexus and is the first sedan to get the treatment. Lexus says that the special, limited-production Deep Garnet color is a metallic share of red that “shimmers in direct sun” while having a “deep, lustrous, tone” in the shade.The interior is particularly attractive with white leather trim used on the seats, center console, and door panels. The leather is semi-aniline and uses a dyeing process that gives it a bright white color. The white is a stark contrast to the black dashboard, steering wheel, and carpet. AdChoices广告center_img The door panels have Kiriko glass trim that was previously only offered on the Executive Package. The design of the glass panel is meant to reflect the white door trim and the Mark Levinson speaker grills. Lexus says that the glass bridges the light and dark elements.The car also has blue LED dash lights and Lexus puddle lamps at each door. These lamps throw the word “Lexus” on the ground when the doors open. The 2020 LS 500 Inspiration Series uses a 3.5L V6 engine that makes 416hp and 442 lb-ft of torque. The RWD version reaches 60 mph in 4.6 seconds; an AWD version is offered. Lexus will make only 300 LS 500 Inspiration Series units that will go on sale this fall with pricing announced closer to launch.last_img read more

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First Edition April 9 2014

first_imgToday’s headlines include coverage of the release of Medicare billing and utilization data, as well as early insights into who enrolled in health coverage as a result of the health law.   Kaiser Health News: Early Drug Claims Suggest Exchange Plan Enrollees Are Sicker Than AverageKaiser Health News staff writer Julie Appleby, working in partnership with The Daily Beast, reports: “Offering a first glimpse of the health care needs of Americans who bought coverage through federal and state marketplaces, an analysis of the first two months of claims data shows the new enrollees are more likely to use expensive specialty drugs to treat conditions like HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C than those with job-based insurance” (Appleby, 4/9). Read the story.Kaiser Health News: Oregon Medicaid Plan Sees High DemandOregon Public Broadcasting’s Kristian Fodn-Vencil, working in collaboration with Kaiser Health News and NPR, reports: “Millions of Americans who didn’t have health insurance last year now do, as a result of the Affordable Care Act. In Lane County, Oregon, Trillium Community Health Plan is struggling to deal with a huge influx of new patients. CEO Terry Coplin says they expected 26,000 people to sign up in the first few years. Instead, about that many signed up in the first few months” (Foden-Vencil, 4/8). Read the story.Kaiser Health News: Capsules: Primary Care Shortage? Not For The Insured, Study ShowsWHYY’s Elana Gordon, working in partnership with Kaiser Health News, reports: “Researchers posing as nonelderly adult patients made nearly 13,000 calls to primary care practices across Pennsylvania, New Jersey and eight other states between fall 2012 and spring of last year. What they found may provide some comfort amid growing concerns of doctor shortages, especially as more people gain coverage through the Affordable Care Act, potentially straining the health system” (Gordon, 4/8). Check out what else is on the blog.The New York Times: Sliver Of Medicare Doctors Get Big Share Of PayoutsA tiny fraction of the 880,000 doctors and other health care providers who take Medicare accounted for nearly a quarter of the roughly $77 billion paid out to them under the federal program, receiving millions of dollars each in some cases in a single year, according to the most detailed data ever released in Medicare’s nearly 50-year history (Abelson and Cohen, 4/9).The Washington Post: Data Uncover Nation’s Top Medicare BillersThe Medicare program is the source of a small fortune for many U.S. doctors, according to a trove of government records that reveal unprecedented details about physician billing practices nationwide. The government insurance program for older people paid nearly 4,000 physicians in excess of $1 million each in 2012, according to the new data. Those figures do not include what the doctors billed private insurance firms (Whoriskey, Keating and Somashekhar, 4/9).The Wall Street Journal: Small Slice Of Doctors Account For Big Chunk Of Medicare CostsThe long-awaited data reveal for the first time how individual medical providers treat America’s seniors—and, in some cases, may enrich themselves in the process. Still, there are gaps in the records released by the U.S. about physicians’ practice patterns, and doctors’ groups said the release of such data leaves innocent physicians open to unfair criticism (Weaver, McGinty and Radnofsky, 4/9).Los Angeles Times: Release Of Medicare Doctor Payments Shows Some Huge PayoutsEnding decades of secrecy, Medicare is showing what the giant healthcare program for seniors pays individual doctors, and the figures reveal that more than a dozen physicians received in excess of $10 million each in 2012. The Obama administration is releasing a detailed account Wednesday of $77 billion in government payouts to more than 880,000 healthcare providers nationwide that year. The release of payment records involving doctors has been legally blocked since 1979, but recent court rulings removed those obstacles. No personal information on patients is disclosed (Terhune, Levey and Smith, 4/8).The Associated Press: Medicare Database Reveals Top-Paid DoctorsTopping Medicare’s list was Florida ophthalmologist Salomon Melgen, whose relationship with Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., made headlines last year after news broke that the lawmaker used the doctor’s personal jet for trips to the Dominican Republic. Medicare paid Melgen $20.8 million. AP’s analysis found that a small sliver of the more than 825,000 individual physicians in Medicare’s claims data base — just 344 physicians — took in top dollar, at least $3 million apiece for a total of nearly $1.5 billion (4/9).USA Today: First Look At Medicare Data In 35 YearsReimbursements to doctors who provide Medicare services in 2012 ranged from nearly $21 million to a single Florida ophthalmologist to the $27,000 for the average anesthesiologist, according to the first look at government payment data in 35 years. The data were released this week by the Center for Medicare Services after a court order lifted an injunction sought by the American Medical Association had been in place since 1979 (Hoyer and Kennedy, 4/9).Politico: Medicare Pay Data Laid BareYet the massive release brings what federal health officials tout as a measure of transparency to a notoriously inscrutable system. Academic researchers and the media are expected to immediately begin dissecting the information to identify potential cases of fraud or abuse as well as differences in how Medicare services are used in various parts of the country (Norman, 4/9).The New York Times: Doctor With Big Medicare Billings Is No Stranger To ScrutinyThe doctor who bills the most for Medicare in the country is a South Florida ophthalmologist whose offices were twice raided last year by the FBI and whose generous political contributions and cozy relationship with New Jersey Senator Robert Menendez are under investigation by federal public corruption prosecutors, a New York Times analysis of Medicare data shows (Robles, 4/9).Here’s the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services provider data site. The New York Times: Study Looks At Earliest Health Law EnrolleesThe health of those who enrolled in new coverage is being closely watched because many observers have questioned whether the new marketplaces would attract a large share of sick people, which could lead to higher premiums and ultimately doom the new law (Thomas, 4/9).Los Angeles Times: Employer Insurance Increasing As Obamacare Rolls Out, Study FindsIn addition to gains in insurance coverage as a direct result of the Affordable Care Act, the number of Americans covered by employer-provided insurance also has increased in the last year, according to newly released data from the Rand Corp. As previously reported by my colleague Noam N. Levey, Rand estimated that the number of Americans with health insurance rose by about 9.3 million as of mid-March. The group’s researchers note that the number probably has increased as their survey missed much of the final surge of enrollments in the online marketplaces created by the healthcare law, also known as Obamacare (Lauter, 4/8).The Associated Press: Many ‘Obamacare’ Critics Accepted Its SubsidiesSeveral big corporations have reaped millions of dollars from “Obamacare” even as they support GOP candidates who vow to repeal the law. This condemn-while-benefiting strategy angers Democrats, who see some of their top congressional candidates struggling against waves of anti-Obamacare ads partly funded by these companies (4/8).The Wall Street Journal: Health-Care Law, Economy Boost Ranks Of The InsuredResearch released Tuesday shows 9.3 million Americans gained insurance coverage since the Affordable Care Act took full effect, though most who bought policies through newly established exchanges weren’t uninsured and employers accounted for much of the rise in the newly covered. The figures from the nonpartisan research firm Rand Corp. are the latest findings to paint an emerging picture of the law’s impact. This and other studies released recently suggest the 2010 law is meeting its goal of lowering the number of Americans without insurance (Corbett Dooren, 4/8).NPR: Lessons Learned For 2015 From This Year’s Obamacare Sign-UpsPresident Obama was thrilled last week when he was able to announce that more than 7 million people have signed up for insurance under the Affordable Care Act. “This law is doing what it’s supposed to do,” the president said in the Rose Garden. “It’s working.” But that’s not to say it couldn’t work better. Among those suggesting ways to help is the consumer group Families USA. The group’s got a list of 10 specific changes it says could improve outreach and make the overall process easier for people to navigate (Rovner, 4/9).The Associated Press:Va. Senate Passes Budget With Expanded MedicaidThe Virginia Senate approved its version of a roughly $96 billion two-year budget Tuesday as Republicans and Democrats pointed fingers over who is responsible for a potential state government shutdown. Two weeks after the start of a special session devoted to passing a state budget, the Democratically controlled Senate approved a spending plan that includes accepting federal Medicaid funds to provide new health insurance to as many as 400,000 low-income residents (4/8).The Washington Post: Gansler Asks O’Malley For Independent Probe Of Maryland Health Exchange, Gets RebuffedMaryland gubernatorial hopeful Douglas F. Gansler on Tuesday called on Gov. Martin O’Malley (D) to appoint a special counsel to investigate the state’s online health insurance exchange, in his latest attempt to call attention to its shortcomings (Wagner, 4/8).The Washington Post: Democrats, GOP Clash As Debate Opens On Ryan Budget PlanRyan aims to reduce the top individual income-tax bracket to 25 percent and keep military spending on its current trajectory. About $3 trillion of his savings would come from revamping health care, first by repealing the ACA — but leaving intact taxes and savings from the law — and by altering Medicare into a program in which the elderly would receive premium supports from the federal government but buy insurance on their own (Kane and Yoder, 4/8).The Associated Press: GOP Lawmakers Balk When Spending Cuts Turn RealWhen House Republicans pass Rep. Paul Ryan’s budget for a fourth year in a row this week, they’ll go on record again in favor of big spending cuts across a wide swath of programs, including Medicaid, food and farm aid and eliminating subsidies for Amtrak and airline flights to small cities. But a budget is only a non-binding framework. It can promise the sky, but to actually fulfill its pledges requires follow-up legislation (4/8).The Wall Street Journal’s Washington Wire: Top Ten Campaign Ads: The More Things Change….In fact, three of the top five ads focus on health care and date from the 2008 presidential campaign, providing a bracing reminder of how little the last six years of debate about health care have done to resolve differences between the parties. The No.1 ad — an attack on GOP presidential nominee John McCain’s health-care proposals by then-Sen. Barack Obama – features arguments that sound very much like today’s slings and arrows (Hook, 4/9).The Wall Street Journal’s Washington Wire: Koch Brothers Launch Health Law Ads Against Democrats Udall, BraleyThe campaign arm of the Koch-backed nonprofit Freedom Partners launched on Tuesday a nearly $1.1 million ad campaign against two Democratic Senate candidates: Rep. Bruce Braley of Iowa and Sen. Mark Udall of Colorado. The campaign, which will be broadcast in both states for the next three weeks, targets the candidates’ support of the Affordable Care Act (Ballhaus, 4/8).Los Angeles Times: CVS Caremark To Pay $20 Million To Settle SEC ChargesCVS Caremark Corp., the country’s second-largest pharmacy chain, has agreed to pay $20 million to settle charges that it misled investors and used improper accounting techniques to artificially boost its financial earnings, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission announced Tuesday. … According to the SEC, CVS had conducted a $1.5-billion bond offering in 2009 but did not tell investors that it had recently lost “significant” Medicare Part D and contract revenues in its pharmacy benefits business segment (Lopez, 4/8).The Wall Street Journal: CVS To Pay $20 Million To Settle SEC AllegationsCVS allegedly further misled investors on an earnings call that same day by maintaining there was a slight improvement in its “retention rate,” the SEC claimed, saying the drugstore chain omitted changes to how it calculated the rate. The SEC also claimed the company made improper accounting adjustments that overstated the financial results for its retail pharmacy business. Those adjustments were tied to CVS’s treatment for its acquisition of another drug-store chain, Longs Drugs Stores (Kell, 4/8).Los Angeles Times: Takeda And Eli Lilly Ordered To Pay $9 Billion Over Actos DrugA federal jury awarded a combined $9 billion in punitive damages against Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A. Inc. and Eli Lilly & Co. after it found that the drug makers did not disclose cancer risks for their diabetes medicine, Actos (Li, 4/8).The Wall Street Journal: Intuitive Surgical Earnings Fall As Robot Demand SoftensIntuitive Surgical, which is expected to report earnings April 22, has struggled over the past year as doctors took a more conservative approach toward performing some minimally invasive procedures. Concerns about the safety and cost-effectiveness of the company’s robots have also hurt sales, analysts said (Walker and Stynes, 4/8).NPR: Calif. Medical Center Offers Cure To Indigenous Language BarrierImmigrants from Mexico don’t always speak Spanish. Instead they speak indigenous languages. That’s created huge communications problems but a hospital in Salinas has found a solution (Almanzan, 4/9). Check out all of Kaiser Health News’ e-mail options including First Edition and Breaking News alerts on our Subscriptions page. This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. First Edition: April 9, 2014last_img read more

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Justice Dept Sues Spinal Surgeon For Alleged Medicare Fraud

first_img This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. The Wall Street Journal: Justice Department Sues Surgeon Aria Sabit Over Spinal OperationsThe Justice Department sued a neurosurgeon and the operators of a network of doctor-owned implant distributorships, alleging they defrauded Medicare of millions of dollars with unnecessary spinal surgeries. The neurosurgeon, Dr. Aria Sabit, and the distributorship network, Reliance Medical Systems LLC, were the subject of a 2013 Page One article in The Wall Street Journal detailing that Dr. Sabit profited from implants he used in dozens of surgeries at a California hospital, some with tragic outcomes (Carreyrou, 9/9). Justice Dept. Sues Spinal Surgeon For Alleged Medicare Fraudlast_img read more

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Viewpoints Insurers Health Law Secret How Scalias Death Impacts Pending Cases

first_img Deaths from drug overdoses have exploded around the country, fueled in part by addiction to prescription painkillers. Earlier this month, a Los Angeles doctor was sentenced to 30 years to life in prison after being convicted of murder in the overdose deaths of patients for whom she overprescribed such drugs. It was apparently the first such conviction in the United States. Some say the prosecution will make the medical community hesitant to prescribe opioids to patients who need them. (2/17) The New York Times Room For Debate: Prosecuting Doctors In Prescription Drug Overdose Deaths The Baltimore Sun: The Health Care Gap Viewpoints: Insurers’ Health Law Secret; How Scalia’s Death Impacts Pending Cases A selection of opinions on health care from around the country. Detroit Free Press: Snyder’s Resignation Would Be No Victory Forbes: Texas Health System Solving Uncoordinated Post-Acute Care JAMA: Ensuring The Quality Of Quality Metrics For Emergency Care Forbes: Biden Was Right: Medicaid Provider Taxes A ‘Scam’ That Should Be Scrapped Los Angeles Times: Dirty Little Secret: Insurers Actually Are Making A Mint From Obamacare With no end to Flint’s water emergency in sight, a lot of Michiganders — most genuinely furious, some sensing political opportunity — are demanding Gov. Rick Snyder’s recall or resignation for his role in the crisis. And I suspect there have been mornings when either prospect looked attractive to Snyder, who has seen himself demoted from everyone’s favorite vice presidential prospect to poisoner-in-chief in little more than an eye-blink. But I wish some of those howling for Snyder’s scalp would explain how his abrupt departure would accelerate relief to Flint’s beleaguered residents or hasten the reversal of the regulatory neglect that precipitated the city’s ongoing public health emergency. (Brian Dickerson, 1/15) Beginning last August, student journalists from the University of Maryland’s Philip Merrill College of Journalism in partnership with the non-profit Kaiser Health News were dispatched to West Baltimore to answer this simple question: In a city with some of the finest health institutions in the world, how could there be such enormous disparities in health outcomes? (2/16) Bloomberg: Scalia’s Death Probably Flips Big Cases center_img Provider taxes demonstrate the worst aspect of our nation’s health care entitlement programs (Medicare, Medicaid, and the Affordable Care Act)—complicated rules and subsidies that profit special interest groups and empower government bureaucracies with too little benefit for patients most in need and taxpayers. (Brian Blase, 2/16) In this issue of JAMA, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) presents final recommendations for screening children aged 18 to 30 months for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Autism spectrum disorder can be responsible for significant, long-term impairment in social interaction, communication, and functional capacity. Emerging evidence suggests that early intensive behavioral therapy has the potential to improve outcomes. The prevalence of ASD has increased in recent years and is estimated to be as high as 1 in 68 children, suggesting that improving long-term outcomes could have substantial societal impact. (Michael Silverstein and Jenny Radesky, 2/16) How will the death of Justice Antonin Scalia affect the major cases before the U.S. Supreme Court this term, all of which are expected to be decided by the end of June? The answer doesn’t depend entirely on how Scalia would’ve voted. It also depends on a necessary rule of procedure: When the Supreme Court is divided equally, it upholds the decision below. … The Texas abortion case to be argued March 2, Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt, is an anomaly. The 5th Circuit upheld the law despite its effect of closing down most of the abortion clinics in the state. Kennedy was expected to be the deciding vote, and he still will be. If he votes to uphold the decision below, the tally will almost certainly be 4-4. If he votes to strike it down, it’ll be 5-3. Either way, he makes the call. (Noah Feldman, 2/16) Every year in the United States there are more than 136 million total visits to emergency departments (EDs). Approximately 20% of adult patients who seek ED care will be hospitalized, and the rest will be treated and discharged, usually to home. However, a proportion of patients who are discharged from the ED will soon return for additional ED care, usually related to the problem treated at the previous visit or on occasion for new symptoms. Depending on location, payer mix, and acuity of illness, rates of return visits to the ED range from 7.5% to 22.4% between 3 days and 30 days. (James G. Adams, 2/16) The opioid abuse epidemic has become a major issue on the campaign trail because the number of people who die each year from opioid overdoses is approaching 30,000. But it’s important to note that nearly two-thirds of those deaths are due to overdoses of prescription opioids, not heroin. (Merrill Goozner, 2/13) As the $1 trillion shift from volume to value is rapidly becoming reality, health systems are responding. The first reality that hits health systems is that the old model of the hospitals as the center of the healthcare universe has led to a catastrophic misalignment of population health resources. Even patients who are heavy utilizers (aka Hot Spotters) spend 99+% of their lives outside the hospital. The handwriting on the wall couldn’t be clearer for forward-looking health executives: They must develop a sound strategy for addressing that other 99+% of the patient’s life. (Dave Chase, 2/16) JAMA: Embrace The Complexity The US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation On Screening For Autism Spectrum Disorder For months now, headlines about the Affordable Care Act have focused on complaints from big insurers that they haven’t been making money from individual insurance plans mandated by the act. Here’s what they haven’t been saying so loudly: They’re making scads of money from Obamacare — so much that almost universally, they’re expanding their participation. What’s the catch? The big profits have come not from the insurance exchanges, but via the ACA’s Medicaid expansion, in which the largest insurers have been playing a major role. (Michael Hiltzik, 2/16) Modern Healthcare: The Latrogenic Roots Of The Opioid Epidemic This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more

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Senate votes to keep oil tanker ban alive as C69 heads to

first_img Join the conversation → Share this storySenate votes to keep oil tanker ban alive, potentially ending defiant streak in upper chamber as C-69 heads to House Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Opponents of Bill C-69 rally outside a public hearing of the Senate Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources in Calgary on April 9, 2019.Jeff McIntosh/CP The Apollo 11 moon landing was so boring it must be real If Americans were going to fake the moon landing, you’d better believe there would be some high drama and maybe even an explosion or two.… More Comment 107 Comments Twitter Observers say Conservative and some Independent senators are likely to propose new amendments to C-48 following the Thursday vote, but that those amendments are unlikely to be accepted before the moratorium becomes law.The votes come as a number of Independent senators have been meeting with officials in the office of Environment Minister Catherine McKenna, part of what some observers say are last-minute negotiations over which proposed changes may ultimately be accepted by the Trudeau government.Sen. Yuen Pau Woo, head representative for the Independent Senators Group and member of the energy committee studying Bill C-69, said he has had “technical briefings” with Environment officials about the legislation but denied discussing specific amendments.“I do not know what they will or will not accept, but we have crafted our amendments in such a way that we tried to make consistent with the objectives of the bill,” Woo said in an interview Tuesday.A government source said it is common for federal officials to meet with senators throughout the study of a bill. The person said Environment officials have spoken with a long list of senators in meetings facilitated by non-affiliated Sen. Grant Mitchell, the sponsor of Bill C-69, largely for technical briefings and sometimes to discuss the likelihood of some amendments being accepted.Two leading oil and gas lobby groups, the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) and the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association (CEPA), proposed about 90 amendments to the bill, which were later put forward by Conservative senators in the final report of the bill.Sen. Woo criticized the nearly word-for-word adoption of the industry-inspired amendments, saying the committee should avoid acting as “stenographers” for corporate interests. Environment Canada also proposed amendments that were tabled through Sen. Mitchell.The industry amendments would amount to a deep restructuring of the bill. They would, among other things, limit the discretionary powers of the environment minister in approving or rejecting major projects, restrict the ability of special interest groups opposed to natural resource development to testify at public hearings, and effectively reverse a bid to sideline the national energy regulator in the decision-making process.In a written statement, McKenna said her office is “carefully considering” the proposed amendments to Bill C-69.“I’m happy that Bill C69 is now through the Senate, despite many delays caused by the Conservatives who wanted to kill the Bill, weaken protections, and limit public discussions,” she said. Meanwhile, the Senate committee’s final report on the C-48 oil tanker moratorium, written by Conservative chair David Tkachuk, said the bill would be “destructive” to Canadian federalism.The highly contentious bill has been criticized for unfairly targeting would-be pipeline projects that would ship oil out of ports along the northern B.C. coast. Environmental advocates and some coastal First Nations support the bill, while a number of other B.C. Indigenous communities have strongly opposed it, saying it restricts their right to develop natural resources on their traditional lands.Bill C-69 has been broadly supported by a number of industry associations, including the Mining Association of Canada, who also forwarded proposed amendments. Environmentalists have also supported the bill, but warn it doesn’t go far enough to protect sensitive ecological regions and account for wider greenhouse gas emissions.Industry groups and environmental advocates are largely in agreement that the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, passed in 2012 by the Harper government, was in need of an update, saying the bill restricted some aspects of Canada’s environmental assessment regime in a bid to get projects built.• Email: jsnyder@postmedia.com | Twitter: jesse_snyder Email OTTAWA — Senators voted on Thursday to save Ottawa’s controversial oil tanker ban, potentially ending a prolonged pushback in the Senate against legislation that has been met with intense criticism by Western provinces and the energy industry.In a 53-38 vote, senators rejected the adoption of a report that would have effectively killed Bill C-48, the moratorium on oil tankers in northern B.C. waters. Also on Thursday, senators adopted a heavily-amended version of another contentious natural resources bill, C-69, which is now headed back to the House of Commons for review. The legislation would overhaul Canada’s environmental assessment process for major projects like oil pipelines and power lines.Both votes put to rest a long saga in which senators have shown uncommon resistance to government legislation, raising concerns about an overzealous Senate that has acted not just as a chamber of sober second thought, according to critics, but as an outright opposition to the House of Commons.Bill C-48 and Bill C-69 have drawn the ire of provincial governments in the oil-rich provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan, as well as industry lobby groups who argue they could delay the construction of major energy projects. Industry has been warning Ottawa about C-69 in particular, amid a failure by the oil and gas industry in recent years to build major pipeline projects like the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, now owned by the federal government.Industry groups and some senators blasted the decision to salvage the tanker moratorium on Thursday.“The vast majority of Trudeau-appointed Senators have decided it is more important to support a bad Liberal bill than to listen to concerns from provincial governments from across the country,” Conservative senate caucus leader Larry Smith said in a statement. The Canadian Chamber of Commerce said it was “deeply disappointed” in the vote and urged senators to find a common ground on the bill.Both bills have received intense scrutiny in the Senate in recent months. The Senate energy committee adopted 188 changes to Bill C-69 on Thursday, the most proposed by the upper house on government legislation in decades.On Bill C-48, meanwhile, the transport committee took the rare move of recommending that the government scrap the legislation altogether, after Independent Sen. Paula Simons voted alongside five Conservative senators to sway a decision in favour of nixing the tanker ban.Senator Paula Simons. Redditcenter_img Senate votes to keep oil tanker ban alive, potentially ending defiant streak in upper chamber as C-69 heads to House Both votes put to rest a long saga in which senators have shown uncommon resistance to government legislation, raising concerns about an overzealous Senate Errol McGihon/Postmedia/File June 6, 20199:15 PM EDTLast UpdatedJune 7, 201910:33 AM EDT Filed underCanadian Politics Jesse Snyder Facebook Featured Stories Recommended For YouAccusations fly at human rights hearing into transgender woman’s Brazilian wax complaintChristie Blatchford: Was Hamilton forensic pathology unit punished for testifying against provincial bosses?Andrew Coyne: Canada Pension Plan caved to pressure from activists — where will it stop?Alberta couple faces scorn over photo with dead lion after U.K. tabloid makes them face of anti-hunting campaignToronto hospital fires around 150 employees after uncovering multimillion-dollar fraud Sponsored By: advertisement ← Previous Next →last_img read more

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Whats New At Chinas Xpeng Motors Lots Of EV Happenings

first_imgSource: Electric Vehicle News There’s a lot of EV stuff going on with this Chinese startup.This is a very busy January for Chinese EV startup XPENG Motors. Let’s review what the company experienced in this month.New StoresLast weekend, a new direct sales and service store in Beijing was opened, adding to the family of 8 other new stores which opened in 6 cities also in January.More China News More Supercharging Stations30 more Supercharging Stations will be in operation in February ahead of the Lunar New Year holiday.The battery can be charged to 80% of its full capacity in just 30 mins.XPENG customers also have access to 100,000 third-party charging piles across China and can reserve them in-car or via the XPENG APP.Many customers are not only fascinated by the smart features such as auto parking and the 360 degree rotating roof camera, but also by the infotainment features such as in-car KTV!First Over-the-air (OTA) Upgrade The G3 also experienced its first OTA upgrade in January. Drivers can now locate and summon the vehicle with a press of the button on their smart key.Enhanced auto parking functions were also implemented through the OTA upgrade.Growing OrdersThe G3 received 1,573 orders during the first 24 hours after its launch last December. Over 10,000 orders were taken as of January. XPENG Motors To Unveil Tesla Model S Challenger This Year BYD Song Max PHEV & EV To Offer Seating For Up To 7center_img NIO Founder Pours Own Money Into Automaker To Show Support Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 2, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Source: Gasgoolast_img read more

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How Much Does A Tesla Model S 3 X Y Actually Cost

first_imgPrice After “Savings”Actual PriceFully LoadedRange Model 3 options include four up-charged paint colors: Midnight Silver Metallic ($1,500), Deep Blue Metallic ($1,500), Pearl White Multi-Coat ($2,000), and Red Multi-Coat ($2,500). The only standard color is Solid Black. The 19-inch sport wheels, on every trim except the Performance model, are a $1,500 option.The base Standard Range model only offers a black interior. On the Standard Range Plus model, though, the black and white interior is available as a $1,000 option.Autopilot is a $3,000 option, and available on all trims. “Full Self-Driving Capability,” which Tesla promises will be available this year, is a $5,000 pre-order on top of Autopilot. If you want “Full Self-Driving” after the fact, it will cost $7,000.A loaded Model 3 Standard Range will set you back $48,200 after options. A Standard Range Plus model with every option is $51,200. Move up to Long Range and Longe Range with dual motors, and those fully loaded Model 3’s cost $57,200 and $61,200, respectively. At the top of the Model 3 Range, a fully loaded Performance model costs $70,700. Standard Range Plus$28,950$38,200$51,200240 Miles Price After “Savings”Actual PriceFully LoadedRange More Tesla News Performance$49,950$59,200$70,700310 Miles Long Range (Dual Motor)$38,950$48,200$61,200310 Miles Source: Electric Vehicle News New Tesla Electric Pickup Render Is Bold, Reminds Us Of Ram Truck Performance$89,750$99,000$130,200315 Miles Long Range$34,950$44,200$57,200325 Miles The numbers might surprise you.There’s a lot of talk about the Tesla pricing structure. Specifically, whether the company will be able to deliver on promised price points for cars like the Model 3 and its brand-new compact SUV, the Model Y. But dig a little deeper on Tesla’s website, and you’ll find that most of the carmaker’s advertised prices are a bit misleading. Mid Range$31,950$41,200$54,200264 Miles Price After “Savings”Actual PriceFully LoadedRange Long Range$42,700$48,200$64,200300 Miles Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 17, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Tesla’s Confusing Price Changes: Here’s A Chart Of The Adjustmentscenter_img Performance$109,950$119,000$142,200289 Miles You won’t actually get a Model 3 for $35,000 (before destination). You probably won’t pay $39,000 for a Model Y, either. If you don’t factor in Tesla’s advertised 10,000-mile over six years “Gasoline Savings” equation (which some countries have deemed “misleading“), or government incentives, Tesla’s cars and SUVs are far more expensive.Tesla Model SDon’t be fooled by the 2019 Tesla Model S’ advertised $69,750 price. Not accounting for Tesla’s estimated “Gasoline Savings” over six years at 10,000 miles per year ($5,500), $3,750 worth of incentives, and including the mandatory $1,200 destination fee, the Model S actually starts at $80,200. And that’s before options. Tesla Model XThe Tesla Model X is the priciest option of all the Teslas. With an actual starting price of $89,200 (before “Gas Savings” and incentives), the Model X is nearly $9,000 more expensive than the Model S. But the SUV only has two trim options: Long Range and Performance. Both trims offer dual electric motors and all-wheel drive. Tick all the options, though, and things start to get pricey. Long Range$78,950$89,200$112,700295 Miles Long Range (Dual Motor)$46,700$51,000$68,200280 Miles Tesla Model 3Tesla advertised its “most-affordable” vehicle, the Model 3, with a starting price of $35,000. And outside of a $1,200 destination fee, that price is pretty much accurate. Factoring in the “Gas Savings” of 10,000 miles per year at $2.58 per gallon, the advertised price on the website is actually lower, at $29,650. But that’s not what you’ll pay – especially not after options. Performance$58,700$64,200$75,700280 Miles Long Range$73,750$83,000$100,700335 Miles The only standard exterior color is Solid Black. Two optional colors, Midnight Silver Metallic, and Deep Blue Metallic cost $1,500. Pearl White Multi-Coat costs $2,000, and Red Multi-Coat costs $2,500. The 19-inch Sonic Carbon Slipstream Wheels are a $1,500 extra, and the 21-inch Sonic Carbon Twin Turbine Wheels cost $4,500.The standard black vegan-friendly faux leather interior trim is no extra cost. But black and white, and cream options both cost $1,500. The optional interiors also include features like a medical-grade HEPA air filtration system, XM radio with a custom sound system, a heated steering wheel, and heated seats for every ass. Autopilot is another $3,000, and “Full Self-Driving Capability,” which Tesla promises this year, can be pre-ordered at a cost of $5,000.With all the option boxes ticked, the most-expensive Model S Standard Range costs $96,700 (including $1,200 destination). Upgrade to the Long Range dual motors, and the most-expensive Model S sets you back $100,700. The Performance model, meanwhile, with a $15,000 Ludicrous Mode and every option, costs $130,200. Optional paint colors vary in price from $1,500 to $2,500 on all trims. A set of 19-inch sport wheels, meanwhile, are a $1,500 option on the Long Range models, but standard on the Performance model. Tesla offers a standard all black interior, or a $1,000 black and white faux leather option. A five-seat interior is standard, but a seven-seat option is available for $3,000.And like all other Teslas on this list, Autopilot is a $3,000 option, and buyers can pre-order “Full Self-Driving Capability” for $5,000 on top of that. Remember, loading your Model Y (or any Tesla) with “Full Self-Driving Capability” after ordering will set you back $7,000.A loaded Long Range model with three rows costs $64,200. A Long Range model with dual motors will set you back $68,200 after options. Going all out on a loaded Performance models costs $75,700 after $1,200 for destination. Price After “Savings”Actual PriceMost ExpensiveRange Four of the five exterior colors are options ranging from $1,500 in price (Midnight Silver Metallic) up to $2,500 for Red Multi-Coat. Tesla offers three wheel options on the Model X, too: standard 20-inch silver wheels, 20-inch Sonic Carbon wheels ($2,000), and 22-inch Onyx Black wheels ($5,500).The Long Range model comes standard with a black interior, but offers optional white and black ($1,500) and cream-colored ($1,500) faux leather finishes as well. On both trims, Autopilot is a $3,000 option, and “Full Self-Driving Capability” is a $5,000 option on top of that. A loaded Long Range Model X costs $112,700 with destination, and a Performance model with the same options (and $15,000 for Ludicrous Mode) costs $142,200.Tesla Model YTesla promises a $39,000 price tag (eventually) for its new SUV, the Model Y. For now, it’s base $48,200 before “Savings” makes it more than $40,000 cheaper than the Model X. And it’s not even that ill-equipped once you start ticking all the option boxes. Standard Range$69,750$80,200$96,700275 Miles Standard Range$26,950$36,200$48,200220 Miles Why We Need To Be Underwhelmed By The Tesla Model Ylast_img read more

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